The departure, Fécamp, 1949. Photographed by Willy Ronis.

The departure, Fécamp, 1949. Photographed by Willy Ronis.

Too many spivs, 1954. Photographed by Bert Hardy.

Too many spivs, 1954. Photographed by Bert Hardy.

Little girl passing by a woman catching a nap perched atop her…

Little girl passing by a woman catching a nap perched atop her bicycle in downtown Los Angeles, November 7, 1983.

Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller during the photo session in…

Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller during the photo session in Richard Avedon’s studio in 1957.

A Close Look At The First Use Of The Word “Ame…

This is the famous Waldseemüller map, from 1507. It is believed to be the first use of the word “America” as a name for the newly-encountered continents. Waldseemüller was apparently impressed with the stories of Amerigo Vespucci, and bestowed the name on today’s South America in honor of Vespucci.

Waldseemüller

also named North America “Parias” on this map. Parias came directly from a passage in the Four Voyages of Amerigo Vespucci: the expedition arrives at a region that was “situated in the torrid zone directly under the parallel which describes the Tropic of Cancer. And this province is called by them [the inhabitants] Parias.” The (possibly) indigenous name did not stick. (I had not heard the word “Parias” before writing this post, and you probably hadn’t either.) Instead, the two continents are called after a random Italian explorer because a random German mapmaker was a fan of the explorer’s book. But that’s history for you.

The Waldseemüller map was intended for a well-educated, elite audience. It was large, made of twelve panels, each 18 by 24.5 inches (46 cm by 62 cm). The entire map could be hung on a wall, or kept folded for when one wanted to reference a particular panel. One thousand copies of the map were printed, and unfortunately, there remains only one survivor in its entirety. It is now housed at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC.

The hand of Clarence Madison Dally, a glassblower who worked…

The hand of Clarence Madison Dally, a glassblower who worked with Thomas Edison, ca. 1900.

“Never Forget Who Helped You!” – Amazing then and now photos of…

“Never Forget Who Helped You!” – Amazing then and now photos of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and coach John Wooden.

Gorgeous color photos of Anne Baxter in the 1940s and 1950s.

Gorgeous color photos of Anne Baxter in the 1940s and 1950s.

The balloon seller, Buenos Aires, 1921. Photographed by Newton…

The balloon seller, Buenos Aires, 1921. Photographed by Newton W. Gulick.

Sailors on leave at Fisherman’s Wharf buying souvenirs,…

Sailors on leave at Fisherman’s Wharf buying souvenirs, San Francisco, 1954. Photographed by Fred Lyon.