From Jaina Island’s cemetary, where archaeologists have found figurines cradled in the arms of the deceased.

This figurine is special because rather than depicting the deceased as a robust young adult,  it shows a proud elderly warrior. He is definitely a warrior because he holds a flexible, rectangular shield in his right hand and wears a quilted armor tunic, both being requisite for Maya warriors during this period.

Earthenware figure, crafted sometime between 550 CE and 850 CE.

THE Seven Ancient Wonders of the World were known in Greek as Themata or ‘things to be seen’ which is now referred to as ‘must see’ sites. Watch our new video to learn more about the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World!  

A six-inch-long (10 cm) fragment of a ceramic figurine, apparently a woman’s torso, has been unearthed at the site of a workshop in northeastern Bulgaria near the coast of the Black Sea. The torso is decorated with stamped lines criss-cross the front and the back. There are also encrusted geometric motifs which might have been depicting clothing.

The complete statue is thought to have stood about 12 inches tall when it was created sometime in the brief Middle Chalcolithic period, between 4700 and 4600 BCE.

440 Years Old And Filled With Footprints, These Aren’t Your Everyday Maps:

In 1577, King Philip II of Spain wanted to know whom he was ruling and where in his vast kingdom they were. So his viceroy asked the indigenous groups in what is now Mexico to draw some maps for him.

In response, they drew maps blending indigenous and Spanish traditions. Sometimes rivers are straight, with tiny arrows in the middle, to indicate which way they flow. Paths have footprints or hoofprints in the middle, to indicate whether the paths can be walked or ridden. These beautiful maps, and their way of recording the landscape, are a silent testimony to the survival of indigenous worldviews into the late 1500s.

Halloween Matching Card Game:

Check out our Halloween matching card game – perfect for students and kids! ancient.eu/lessonplan/10/halloween-matching-card-game/ 

Thingvellir and Viking Assembly Sites with Dr. Alexandra Sanmark: undefined

On the Island of South Ronaldsay in the Orkney Islands north of Scotland is a peculiar tomb. The site is a chambered tomb, built into the cliff’s edge around 3,500 BCE, and it wasn’t re-discovered until the 1950s. As you probably guessed from this post’s title, the tomb is the final resting place of 8 to 20 people – and 14 white sea eagles. Recent dating tells us the people were buried in it about 1,000 years before the eagles were.

It’s an amazing example of how a neolithic tomb was in use for many generations, and evolved in its meaning over time. Personally, I think its pretty cool that 1,000 years after their ancestors died, someone added eagles to accompany them.

Two gilded silver dragon figurines featuring detailed horns, eyes, teeth, and feathers have been discovered in a Xiongnu elite tomb in north-central Mongolia. The dragons bear obvious characteristics of the Western Han Dynasty (206 BCE to 9 CE). They are evidence of the cultural exchange and interaction between the prairie in the north and central China, as well as the high status of the Xiongu buried in the tomb.

Of course, the silver dragons were not the only rich items they were buried with: a trove of gold, silver, bronze, jade and wood artifacts have also been found.

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ANCIENT History Encyclopedia is delighted to support the Southern Summer School of the UNESCO chair in ICT to develop and promote sustainable tourism in World Heritage Sites, which is realized in collaboration with the University of Namibia and the University of Turku (Finland). 

It will take place in Namibia from February 9 to 15, 2020 and will focus on Digital Communication of Indigenous African Heritage and Fashion. Applications are welcome by November 24, 2019. Please click here for more information: http://www.unescochair.usi.ch/southern-summer-school-2020