Author: This Day In History

Thanks for the responses!

Thank you so much everyone for responding to my last post, really great to hear that you’re all still around and keen for more content.

I can’t promise daily posts will resume but I will have a think about the best way to get this running again in some way. Watch this space!

Thanks for the responses!

Thank you so much everyone for responding to my last post, really great to hear that you’re all still around and keen for more content.

I can’t promise daily posts will resume but I will have a think about the best way to get this running again in some way. Watch this space!

Hello!

Firstly, I would like to apologise for the radio silence on this blog for nearly two years. Once I left university and began full-time employment I just couldn’t keep to the daily posting schedule while ensuring good-quality content.

Thank you to those of you who messaged me during this time, please know that your kind words were gratefully received.

That said, I’m really starting to miss engaging with you all. So, who would like to see this blog back in action??

If this post gets enough notes (so I can see if any of my followers are still active on here!) I’ll try to find out from you guys how best to get the blog back up and running!

Thank you again for your support and hopefully you’ll be hearing more from me soon!

Katie

Hello!

Firstly, I would like to apologise for the radio silence on this blog for nearly two years. Once I left university and began full-time employment I just couldn’t keep to the daily posting schedule while ensuring good-quality content.

Thank you to those of you who messaged me during this time, please know that your kind words were gratefully received.

That said, I’m really starting to miss engaging with you all. So, who would like to see this blog back in action??

If this post gets enough notes (so I can see if any of my followers are still active on here!) I’ll try to find out from you guys how best to get the blog back up and running!

Thank you again for your support and hopefully you’ll be hearing more from me soon!

Katie

April 4th 1841: President William Henry Harrison dies

On
this day in 1841, the 9th President of the United States, William Henry
Harrison, died in office. Harrison’s time in office was the shortest of
any US President, serving only 32 days. He died of complications from
pneumonia which he supposedly caught at his inauguration, held in the
middle of winter, as he did not want to look old and so refused to wear a
coat. Harrison was the oldest President to take office, aged 68, until
Ronald Reagan in 1981. He was succeeded upon his death by his
Vice-President John Tyler.

April 4th 1841: President William Henry Harrison dies

On
this day in 1841, the 9th President of the United States, William Henry
Harrison, died in office. Harrison’s time in office was the shortest of
any US President, serving only 32 days. He died of complications from
pneumonia which he supposedly caught at his inauguration, held in the
middle of winter, as he did not want to look old and so refused to wear a
coat. Harrison was the oldest President to take office, aged 68, until
Ronald Reagan in 1981. He was succeeded upon his death by his
Vice-President John Tyler.

April 3rd 1968: King’s last speech

On this day
in 1968, the American civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. made
his last speech, the day before his assassination. King was one of many leaders of the Civil Rights Movement for racial equality in America, but became the
face of the movement for his non-violent tactics and powerful oratory.
In 1963,
during the March on Washington, King delivered the crowning speech of
the struggle – the ‘I have a dream’ speech. Beyond his role in combating
racial inequality, King also focused on tackling poverty and advocating
peace, especially during the Vietnam War. In April 1968, King visited
Memphis in solidarity with striking sanitation workers. It was at the
Mason Temple in this city that he delivered his ‘I’ve Been to the Mountaintop’
speech. The
very next day,
King was assassinated at his Memphis hotel by James Earl Ray. His final
speech was remarkably prophetic, as he appeared to acknowledge he would
not live long. King, a Baptist minister, invoked the Biblical story of Moses, who led the
Israelites out of slavery in Egypt but died before he could enter the
Promised Land.

“Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. Longevity
has its place. But I’m not concerned about that now. I just want to do
God’s will. And He’s allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I’ve
looked over. And I’ve seen the promised land. I may not get there with
you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to
the promised land.”

April 3rd 1968: King’s last speech

On this day
in 1968, the American civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. made
his last speech, the day before his assassination. King was one of many leaders of the Civil Rights Movement for racial equality in America, but became the
face of the movement for his non-violent tactics and powerful oratory.
In 1963,
during the March on Washington, King delivered the crowning speech of
the struggle – the ‘I have a dream’ speech. Beyond his role in combating
racial inequality, King also focused on tackling poverty and advocating
peace, especially during the Vietnam War. In April 1968, King visited
Memphis in solidarity with striking sanitation workers. It was at the
Mason Temple in this city that he delivered his ‘I’ve Been to the Mountaintop’
speech. The
very next day,
King was assassinated at his Memphis hotel by James Earl Ray. His final
speech was remarkably prophetic, as he appeared to acknowledge he would
not live long. King, a Baptist minister, invoked the Biblical story of Moses, who led the
Israelites out of slavery in Egypt but died before he could enter the
Promised Land.

“Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. Longevity
has its place. But I’m not concerned about that now. I just want to do
God’s will. And He’s allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I’ve
looked over. And I’ve seen the promised land. I may not get there with
you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to
the promised land.”

April 2nd 1982: Argentina invades the Falkland Islands

On
this day in 1982, Argentine forces landed on the Falkland Islands and
occupied the area, which marked the beginning of the Falklands War. The
war was the product of long tensions over who possessed the islands,
with Argentina claiming ownership and Britain seeing the islands as
British territory. Argentine forces landed on the islands and fought the
British Royal Marines at Government House, leading to British surrender
and thus Argentina seizing control of the Falklands. British Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher responded by sending a naval task force to
attack the Argentinians. The conflict killed 649 Argentinians, 255
Britons and three Falkland Islanders, even though it only lasted 74
days. The war ended with Argentine surrender on 14th June, thus
returning the islands to Britain.

April 2nd 1982: Argentina invades the Falkland Islands

On
this day in 1982, Argentine forces landed on the Falkland Islands and
occupied the area, which marked the beginning of the Falklands War. The
war was the product of long tensions over who possessed the islands,
with Argentina claiming ownership and Britain seeing the islands as
British territory. Argentine forces landed on the islands and fought the
British Royal Marines at Government House, leading to British surrender
and thus Argentina seizing control of the Falklands. British Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher responded by sending a naval task force to
attack the Argentinians. The conflict killed 649 Argentinians, 255
Britons and three Falkland Islanders, even though it only lasted 74
days. The war ended with Argentine surrender on 14th June, thus
returning the islands to Britain.