Category: alhambra decree

March 31st 1492: Spanish expulsionOn this day in 1492, the…

March 31st 1492: Spanish expulsion

On
this day in 1492, the joint Catholic monarchs of Spain – Ferdinand and
Isabella – issued the Alhambra Decree. This decree ordered the expulsion
of all Jews who refused to convert to Christianity from the Spanish
kingdoms of Castile and Aragon by July 31st. This measure was pushed for
by the monarchs’ adviser Tomas de Torquemada, who spearheaded the
Spanish Inquisition aimed at rooting out heresy. Ferdinand and Isabella
agreed to the expulsion after successfully completing the reconquista
the unification of Spain under Christian rule – with the conquest of
Granada. The majority of the nearly 200,000 Spanish Jews chose to leave
the country rather than renounce their religion and culture. Many of
these Sephardic Jews moved to Turkey, Africa, and elsewhere in Europe,
though they often encountered violence as they tried to leave the
country. The Jews who remained became conversos, suffering harassment and mistrust. The
policy of religious conformity continued in 1502, when Spanish Muslims
were also ordered to convert to Christianity. The Alhambra Decree was formally revoked by the Second Vatican
Council in 1968, as part of a general attempt by the Spanish government
to make amends for the painful legacy of the expulsion.

March 31st 1492: Spanish expulsionOn this day…

March 31st 1492: Spanish expulsion

On
this day in 1492, the joint Catholic monarchs of Spain – Ferdinand and
Isabella – issued the Alhambra Decree. This decree ordered the expulsion
of all Jews who refused to convert to Christianity from the Spanish
kingdoms of Castile and Aragon by July 31st. This measure was pushed for
by the monarchs’ adviser Tomas de Torquemada, who spearheaded the
Spanish Inquisition aimed at rooting out heresy. Ferdinand and Isabella
agreed to the expulsion after successfully completing the reconquista
the unification of Spain under Christian rule – with the conquest of
Granada. The majority of the nearly 200,000 Spanish Jews chose to leave
the country rather than renounce their religion and culture. Many of
these Sephardic Jews moved to Turkey, Africa, and elsewhere in Europe,
though they often encountered violence as they tried to leave the
country. The Jews who remained became conversos, suffering harassment and mistrust. The
policy of religious conformity continued in 1502, when Spanish Muslims
were also ordered to convert to Christianity. The Alhambra Decree was formally revoked by the Second Vatican
Council in 1968, as part of a general attempt by the Spanish government
to make amends for the painful legacy of the expulsion.