Category: ancient history

DOWNLOAD the fun & educational Seven Won…

DOWNLOAD the fun & educational Seven Wonders AR app to take part in the photography contest we’re running with Time Passport!
All you have to do is download the app & share your photos on social media using the hashtag #SevenWondersAR

 More info: https://mailchi.mp/ancient.eu/timepassport-photo-competition 

ahencyclopedia: CARTHAGE:  ACCORDING to legend…

ahencyclopedia:

CARTHAGE: 

ACCORDING to legend, Carthage was founded by the Phoenician Queen Elissa (better known as Dido) sometime around 813 BCE although, actually, it rose following Alexander’s destruction of Tyre in 332 BCE. The city (in modern-day Tunisia, North Africa) was originally known as Kart-hadasht (new city) to distinguish it from the older Phoenician city of Utica nearby. The Greeks called the city Karchedon and the Romans turned this name into Carthago. Originally a small port on the coast, established only as a stop for Phoenician traders to re-supply or repair their ships, Carthage grew to become the most powerful city in the Mediterranean before the rise of Rome.

After the fall of the great Phoenician city of Tyre to Alexander the Great in 332 BCE, those Tyrians who were able to escape fled to Carthage with whatever wealth they had. Since many whom Alexander spared were those rich enough to buy their lives, these refugees landed in the city with considerable means and established Carthage as the new centre of Phoenician trade.

Read More 

Photo

Photo

ANCIENT GREEK SOCIETY: Although ancient Greek …

ANCIENT GREEK SOCIETY: 

Although ancient Greek Society was dominated by the male citizen, with his full legal status, right to vote, hold public office, and own property, the social groups which made up the population of a typical Greek city-state or polis were remarkably diverse. Women, children, immigrants (both Greek and foreign), labourers, and slaves all had defined roles, but there was interaction (often illicit) between the classes and there was also some movement between social groups, particularly for second-generation offspring and during times of stress such as wars.

Although the male citizen had by far the best position in Greek society, there were different classes within this group. Top of the social tree were the ‘best people’, the aristoi. Possessing more money than everyone else, this class could provide themselves with armour, weapons, and a horse when on military campaign. The aristocrats were often split into powerful family factions or clans who controlled all of the important political positions in the polis. Their wealth came from having property and even more importantly, the best land, i.e.: the most fertile and the closest to the protection offered by the city walls.

Read More 

CARTHAGE: ACCORDING to legend, Carthage was fo…

CARTHAGE: 

ACCORDING to legend, Carthage was founded by the Phoenician Queen Elissa (better known as Dido) sometime around 813 BCE although, actually, it rose following Alexander’s destruction of Tyre in 332 BCE. The city (in modern-day Tunisia, North Africa) was originally known as Kart-hadasht (new city) to distinguish it from the older Phoenician city of Utica nearby. The Greeks called the city Karchedon and the Romans turned this name into Carthago. Originally a small port on the coast, established only as a stop for Phoenician traders to re-supply or repair their ships, Carthage grew to become the most powerful city in the Mediterranean before the rise of Rome.

After the fall of the great Phoenician city of Tyre to Alexander the Great in 332 BCE, those Tyrians who were able to escape fled to Carthage with whatever wealth they had. Since many whom Alexander spared were those rich enough to buy their lives, these refugees landed in the city with considerable means and established Carthage as the new centre of Phoenician trade.

Read More 

Burning the Books of the Prophet

Zoroastrianism, arguably the world’s first religion to worship just one god, still exists today – mainly in India. But it barely survived an ancient blow. Specifically, the conquests of Alexander the Great.

When Alexander took Persia in the 320s BCE, large portions of the compiled works of Zarathustra were lost, in the destruction of cities and holy places. Some say it had once been over 12,000 pages. What remained was re-collected after Alexander’s death, named the Avesta, and standardized into a five-part text which is still used by believers today.

The main section, named the Gathas, is the oldest: it contains 17 hymns believed to have been written by Zarathustra during his lifetime. Other sections contain prayers, rituals, accounts of how the world was created, and Zoroastrian law.

NEED some Christmas gift inspiration? Never fe…

NEED some Christmas gift inspiration? Never fear, we’re here to help! We’ve put together some great gift ideas for history enthusiasts. 🎄

View our Christmas gift guide here: https://mailchi.mp/ancient.eu/the-best-gifts-for-history-lovers 

You’ll Be Surprised Where This Frog Necklace C…

It’s from Egypt’s 19th dynasty! Circa 1295–1185 BCE. The orange and blue frogs are made of glass, separated by glass beads.

Link

undefined:

WE’RE featured in the Lovie Letters as winners of the Lovie Silver Award and Lovie People’s Choice Award. 

Find out more about our company here: https://www.lovieletters.eu/#/projects/216 

Regular

In ancient Egypt, silver was more valuable than gold. It had not always been available there, and after silver was introduced, it remained rare through the Early Dynastic Period. As a result silver jewelry was almost always thinner than gold jewelry.

By the Middle Kingdom, though, new sources of silver seem to have opened up because silver became less valuable than gold.