Category: belgium

A soldier stood in the ruins of Ypres, Belgium…

A soldier stood in the ruins of Ypres, Belgium. Sometime during WW1.

via reddit

A holiday in Belgium, 1936.

A holiday in Belgium, 1936.

German field bakery near Ypres, Belgium, 1914

German field bakery near Ypres, Belgium, 1914

via reddit

Belgium’s HumanZoo 1958

Belgium’s HumanZoo 1958

via reddit

Two American soldiers in a foxhole during the …

Two American soldiers in a foxhole during the Battle of the Bulge in Belgium, January 1945. By Tony Vaccaro.

via reddit

German Panzer 38 tanks surprising French Char …

German Panzer 38 tanks surprising French Char B1 Bis tanks as they were refueling near Flavion, Belgium, May 15, 1940-From the book “Tank Versus Tank” by Kenneth Macksey

via reddit

The French tanks were part of the 1st DCR (1re division cuirassée). They were surprised by units of Gruppe Hoth, under the command of General Hermann Hoth, comprising of 5th Panzer Division (General Max von Hartlieb-Walsporn) and 7th Panzer Division (General Erwin Rommel).

For more info on the ensuing battle: http://www.mylittlepanzer.org/009.php

Dancer Nancy Leslie, Ostend, Belgium, 1920

Dancer Nancy Leslie, Ostend, Belgium, 1920

Jewish refugees aboard the ocean liner St. Lou…

Jewish refugees aboard the ocean liner St. Louis return to Europe after being refused entry in Cuba, the US, and Canada. Belgium, 1939

via reddit

Inside an Ambulance Train used during the Fron…

Inside an Ambulance Train used during the Front in Belgium and France. 1918.

via reddit

A New Way To Recover Where Cavemen Lived

Remains of early humans such as Neanderthals and Denisovans have been discovered at just a limited number of sites in Europe and Asia. This has long frustrated archaeologists, who are confident that many more locations were occupied throughout these regions. This year, however, researchers announced a new way of detecting the hominins’ presence—through genetic traces in cave sediments.

A team analyzed sediments from seven sites in France, Belgium, Spain, Croatia, and Russia. They found Neanderthal DNA at three sites, the oldest dating to up to 60,000 years ago, and Neanderthal and Denisovan DNA in Russia’s Denisova Cave, dating to around 100,000 years ago. Amazingly, the new technique worked even with sediment that had been collected many years ago, and was being stored in laboratories.

The researchers hypothesize that the DNA in the sediments comes from body fluids left behind by hominins as well as decomposition of their remains. Bones might wash away, or be buried elsewhere, but the blood, sweat, and tears of the caves’ ancient occupants remained in the soil.