Category: dogs

New genetic research now suggests that when the ancient Inuits migrated from Siberia to North America they brought their dogs with them. Considered one of the toughest and strongest breeds, this ancient Siberian canine was so indispensable, the genetic research shows the Inuits used them exclusively. They did not even interbreed with the new dogs they found in North America. The new study showed that over 4,500 years, Inuit new dogs were and remained genetically distinct and physically different from the dogs who arrived earlier in North America.

Where the humans went they brought their dogs, so Inuit dogs rapidly dominated and spread eastward in the North American Arctic alongside their humans’ migration. Because the Inuit remained faithful to their sled dogs, the pre-existing native dogs were almost completely replaced.

This genetic distinction has been maintained through today, too. The study compared 922 Arctic dogs and wolves who lived over 4,500 years. Modern sled dogs, according to their genomes, are some of the last direct descendants of the breed the Inuit brought with them from Siberia.

Owners groom their dogs backstage at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show at Madison Square Garden in New York, February 1957. Photographed by Ivan Dmitri.

Dog walker, New York, 1967. Photographed by Alfred Eisenstaedt-LIFE.

The Capital Times, Madison, Wisconsin, September 15, 1934

The post Everybody’s Dog appeared first on Yesterday's Print.

Avenue du Bois de Boulogne Paris, 1911. Photographed by Jacques-Henri Lartigue.

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The Daily Times, New Philadelphia, Ohio, October 10, 1919

The post appeared first on Yesterday's Print.

Irish men in the street with their greyhounds in Derry city, December 17, 1955. Photographed by Bert Hardy.

Evening along the Sloterplas, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 1964. Photographed by Leonard Freed.

Clay brick with a stamped cuneiform inscription and a dog’s pawprints.

From the ziggurat at Ur, 2112 BCE – 2004 BCE.

Clay brick with a stamped cuneiform inscription and a dog’s pawprints.

From the ziggurat at Ur, 2112 BCE – 2004 BCE.