Category: Folklore

MEDIEVAL FOLKLORE: 

MEDIEVAL folklore is a body of work, originally transmitted orally, which was composed between the 5th and 15th centuries CE in Europe. Although folktales are a common attribute of every civilization, and such stories were being told by cultures around the world during the medieval period, the phrase “medieval folklore” in the west almost always refers to European tales.

The word “folklore” was coined in 1846 CE by the British writer William John Thoms to replace the more awkward phrase “popular antiquities” which designated the stories, fables, proverbs, ballads, and legends of the common people. In time, folktales were written down and became static but originally they were dynamic and ever-changing stories passed from one generation to the next and moving between cultures as merchants carried the tales to other countries through trade.

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In English, her name means “the Weeping Woman.” She is a legendary figure in Mexico, who wanders for eternity, seeking her lost children. To hear her cries brings misfortune. According to legend, La Llorona was once a living woman, whose husband on day left her for a younger woman. In her grief and anger, La Llorona drowned her children, to hurt their unfaithful father. When she realized what she had done, she drowned herself too.

According to some versions, La Llorona will kidnap wandering children who even vaguely resemble her dead children. Crying and apologizing, she will then drown the children, so they can take the place of her own. La Llorona is understandably a popular threat to keep Mexican children from wandering.

Gumbo Ya-Ya: A Collection of Louisiana Folk Tales, Lyle Saxon, 1945

Gumbo Ya-Ya: A Collection of Louisiana Folk Tales, Lyle Saxon, 1945

Gumbo Ya-Ya: A Collection of Louisiana Folk Tales, Lyle Saxon, 1945

Gumbo Ya-Ya: A Collection of Louisiana Folk Tales, Lyle Saxon, 1945

Folk-lore from Adams County, Illinois, 1935

Folk-lore from Adams County, Illinois, 1935

Folk-lore from Adams County, Illinois, 1935

Folk-lore from Adams County, Illinois, 1935