Category: food

Happy Pi(e) Day! Here’s the 14 sweetest vintage photographs of…

Happy Pi(e) Day! Here’s the 14 sweetest vintage photographs of celebrities indulging in pie.

Medieval Europeans Really Like Spices

A German price table from 1393 shows that seven fat oxen were equal in value to one pound of nutmeg.

Yesterday's Print 2019-01-25 19:46:08

The Secret of Cooking for Cats, written by Martin A Gardner and illustrated by Clare Barnes, 1965

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FOOD IN AN ENGLISH MEDIEVAL CASTLE: IF one was…

FOOD IN AN ENGLISH MEDIEVAL CASTLE: 

IF one was looking to enjoy a fine meal in the medieval world then the best place to find a handsomely laid dinner table was in the local castle. There, in the magnificent Great Hall, feasts were regularly served for the local lord and his entourage of knights and ladies where a hearty appetite was considered a great virtue. The cooks in the castle kitchens could draw on the castle’s own food stores made plentiful with goods either paid in tax by, or commandeered from, the local peasantry or the foodstuffs produced from the castle’s own lands. Supplementing these goodies was anything that the castle residents could bring in from their frequent hunting trips in the local forests. With not much else going on by way of regular entertainment, a good banquet was a highlight of the day and a chance to dress up, try out some exotic foods and be entertained by musicians and poets.

Castles could store plenty of foodstuffs in the basement and ground floor of the tower keep as, without windows (to improve security during a siege), this part of the building was not much good for anything else. In the courtyards of larger castles there were other buildings for brewing beer, making bread, and more storage space such as the buttery which was used to keep a plentiful stock of beer, wine and cider (always useful if the water ran out during a prolonged attack). There might also be a more select stock of spirits such as English mead or French brandy, kept in reserve for the lord and special occasions. In larger castles there was, too, space for keeping livestock, perhaps a dovecote for pigeons, a granary for keeping grain and flour, a pond for fish and a garden for growing herbs, fruit, vines and vegetables.

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Today’s cheesecakes are made with cream …

Today’s cheesecakes are made with cream cheese, plus a combination of sugar, eggs, flour, and flavors. Cream cheese is a modern invention, but cheesecakes go further back. There is evidence that cheesecakes using ricotta, cottage cheese, mascarpone and others existed long before. However, if you traveled back to North America in the 1700s (and Western Europe) and ordered a “cheesecake” you would probably find yourself disappointed.

Cheesecakes used to have no cheese at all! Although they have various flavors a modern eater might recognize, like lemon, many others would be completely foreign, like potato cheesecake. As far as those who study the cookbooks of the 1700s can surmise, such cakes were called cheesecakes because they were made to have the consistency and texture of cheese, and also were usually made in a pie-like dish and kind of resembled a cheese wheel.

Yesterday's Print 2018-12-05 23:20:23

The Minneapolis Star, Minnesota, April 26, 1957

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NOTHING beats warm, comforting food and good…

NOTHING beats warm, comforting food and good company on a cold Winter night! From a 13th century cookbook, to a monastic “foodie” tour of Samarkand, to the recreation of a medieval Scandinavian feast with a modern twist – it’s food history at its finest. 

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Oscar Mayer’s Wienermobile: Photos of its evolution as…

Oscar Mayer’s Wienermobile: Photos of its evolution as America’s favorite driving dog.

Yesterday's Print 2018-11-26 21:30:04

The New York World, New York, August 9, 1896

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Papou’s Restaurant, West Frankfort, Illinois, 1929.

Papou’s Restaurant, West Frankfort, Illinois, 1929.