Category: food

What Was The Neolithic Revolution?

The Neolithic Revolution, also known as the Agricultural Revolution, occurred about 12,000 years ago. For those, like me, who are not the best at math, that is around 10,000 BCE. There was a global trend away from nomadic hunting and gathering and towards sedentary farming. It appears to have arisen independently in multiple places in the Middle East, as well as in China and Papua New Guinea. Egypt and the Indus River Valley may have independently developed agriculture as well, or gotten the idea and the seeds from the Middle East or China.

Cereals, like barley in the Middle East and rice in China, were likely the first to be domesticated, eventually supplemented by protein-rice plants like peas and lentils. As people began to settle down they also domesticated animals. The earliest archaeological evidence of sheep and goat herding comes from around 10,000 BCE in the Iraq and Anatolia. Animals could be used as labor in the fields, or as sources of additional nutrients and calories to supplement the new cereal-heavy diet.

The Neolithic Revolution did not happen everywhere, and not all at once. And there remain a variety of hypotheses as to why humans stopped foraging and started farming. Population pressure may have caused increased competition for food and the need to cultivate new foods; people may have shifted to farming in order to involve elders and children in food production; humans may have learned to depend on plants they modified in early domestication attempts and in turn, those plants may have become dependent on humans. Whatever the reason, the Neolithic Revolution changed humanity – and our world – for good.

Food is everything we are. It’s an exten…

Food is everything we are. It’s an extension of nationalist feeling, ethnic feeling, your personal history, your province, your region, your tribe, your grandma. It’s inseparable from those from the get-go.

The Peanut Butter Court Case

With peanut butter’s growing popularity in the 1950s, poor-quality products flooded the markets, hoping to cash in on the new food trend. Companies used cheaper hydrogenated oils instead of the more expensive peanut oil, and used glycerin as a sweetener.

The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) found that some products labeled as “peanut butter” only contained 75% peanuts. The FDA proposed a standard of 95% peanuts in peanut butter in 1959. Manufacturers did not like this – arguing that customers preferred a more spreadable, and sweeter, product. The spreadable-ness of peanut butter became the focal point of a 12-year “Peanut Butter Case” which wound its way through the American legal system.

To compromise with the manufacturers the FDA initially agreed to lower its peanut butter standard to 90% peanuts. The manufacturers wanted 87% and when the FDA did not budge they took it to court. After too many years and a US Appeals Court appeal, the 90% peanut standard was upheld.

The Peanut Butter Court Case

With peanut butter’s growing popularity in the 1950s, poor-quality products flooded the markets, hoping to cash in on the new food trend. Companies used cheaper hydrogenated oils instead of the more expensive peanut oil, and used glycerin as a sweetener.

The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) found that some products labeled as “peanut butter” only contained 75% peanuts. The FDA proposed a standard of 95% peanuts in peanut butter in 1959. Manufacturers did not like this – arguing that customers preferred a more spreadable, and sweeter, product. The spreadable-ness of peanut butter became the focal point of a 12-year “Peanut Butter Case” which wound its way through the American legal system.

To compromise with the manufacturers the FDA initially agreed to lower its peanut butter standard to 90% peanuts. The manufacturers wanted 87% and when the FDA did not budge they took it to court. After too many years and a US Appeals Court appeal, the 90% peanut standard was upheld.

Did You Know Neolithic Chinese Farmers Grew Mi…

Prehistoric farmers in what is today China had two main crops: millet in the north, rice in the south, and a vast middle region of mixed farming.

You should absolutely look at this map in high-resolution because there is a lot going on. It shows the northermost limit of rice cultivation and the southernmost limit of millet cultivation, possible centers of the domestication of each, and shows archaeological sites where rice, millet, or both were grown in prehistoric times.

Did You Know Neolithic Chinese Farmers Grew Mi…

Prehistoric farmers in what is today China had two main crops: millet in the north, rice in the south, and a vast middle region of mixed farming.

You should absolutely look at this map in high-resolution because there is a lot going on. It shows the northermost limit of rice cultivation and the southernmost limit of millet cultivation, possible centers of the domestication of each, and shows archaeological sites where rice, millet, or both were grown in prehistoric times.

People Have Been Eating Popcorn For A Long Tim…

A 1,000-year-old popped kernel of popcorn was found in a dry cave in the southwestern part of Utah.

Happy Pi(e) Day! Here’s the 14 sweetest vintage photographs of…

Happy Pi(e) Day! Here’s the 14 sweetest vintage photographs of celebrities indulging in pie.

Medieval Europeans Really Like Spices

A German price table from 1393 shows that seven fat oxen were equal in value to one pound of nutmeg.

Yesterday's Print 2019-01-25 19:46:08

The Secret of Cooking for Cats, written by Martin A Gardner and illustrated by Clare Barnes, 1965

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