Category: geography

The History of Urbanization

From the first cities around 3700 BCE up until 2000 CE.

When women got the vote, around the world.

When women got the vote, around the world.

New Zealand was first, and Saudi Arabia was most recent – although women still do not have full voting rights there, as they may only vote or run for office in municipal elections not national elections.

When women got the vote, around the world.

When women got the vote, around the world.

New Zealand was first, and Saudi Arabia was most recent – although women still do not have full voting rights there, as they may only vote or run for office in municipal elections not national elections.

Yams Were Independently Domesticated In Three …

Here is a map of average region yam production today. Can you guess the three places where yams were first domesticated?

Answer: South America, West Africa, and Papua New Guinea!

Where Do Spices Come From?

Mongolia: A Brief Geography Lesson

The Creation of Rotterdam (Pt 2)

A month ago (or so) I posted a couple paragraphs on the Dutch city of Rotterdam’s history. It was titled “The Creation of Rotterdam.” Imagine my surprise when I came across this map, showing the physical expansion of Rotterdam’s port. It was truly created, that is to say, built by men.

What are the “seven seas” that Medieval writer…

What are the “seven seas” that Medieval writers loved to mention?

  1. the Adriatic Sea
  2. the Mediterranean Sea – which includes seas around and in the Mediterranean, like the Aegean Sea, Ionian Sea and Tyrrhenian Sea
  3. the Black Sea
  4. the Caspian Sea
  5. the Persian Gulf
  6. the Arabian Sea – which is today considered part of the Indian Ocean
  7. the Red Sea – including closed Dead Sea and the Sea of Galilee

Political Maps of China in the 1920s

After 4,000 years of dynasties, beginning with the Xia in the 2100s BCE, China had a rough transition to modernity. The country would not be truly unified until after World War II and the victory of the Communist Party in 1948.

Where Oghuz Lives

Oghuz is a sub-branch of the Turkish language family. Approximately 110 million people speak an Oghuz language, and they are broadly able to understand each other.

The fun thing about looking at Oghuz languages’ distribution: it maps out, very clearly, the historical migration of Turks from Central Asia to the Anatolian peninsula.