Category: italy

The Salesman, Naples, Italy, 1958. Photographed by Leonard…

The Salesman, Naples, Italy, 1958. Photographed by Leonard Freed.

Florence, Italy, April 1964. Photographed by Ronald Reis.

Florence, Italy, April 1964. Photographed by Ronald Reis.

Street seller, Naples, Italy, 1960s. Photographed by Victor…

Street seller, Naples, Italy, 1960s. Photographed by Victor Padolfi.

Spaghetti, Naples, Italy, 1950s. Photographed by Victor…

Spaghetti, Naples, Italy, 1950s. Photographed by Victor Pandolfi.

Fruit vendor, Naples, Italy, 1950s. Photographed by Victor…

Fruit vendor, Naples, Italy, 1950s. Photographed by Victor Padolfi.

A Close Look At The First Use Of The Word “Ame…

This is the famous Waldseemüller map, from 1507. It is believed to be the first use of the word “America” as a name for the newly-encountered continents. Waldseemüller was apparently impressed with the stories of Amerigo Vespucci, and bestowed the name on today’s South America in honor of Vespucci.

Waldseemüller

also named North America “Parias” on this map. Parias came directly from a passage in the Four Voyages of Amerigo Vespucci: the expedition arrives at a region that was “situated in the torrid zone directly under the parallel which describes the Tropic of Cancer. And this province is called by them [the inhabitants] Parias.” The (possibly) indigenous name did not stick. (I had not heard the word “Parias” before writing this post, and you probably hadn’t either.) Instead, the two continents are called after a random Italian explorer because a random German mapmaker was a fan of the explorer’s book. But that’s history for you.

The Waldseemüller map was intended for a well-educated, elite audience. It was large, made of twelve panels, each 18 by 24.5 inches (46 cm by 62 cm). The entire map could be hung on a wall, or kept folded for when one wanted to reference a particular panel. One thousand copies of the map were printed, and unfortunately, there remains only one survivor in its entirety. It is now housed at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC.

15 amazing photos of 1974 Lamborghini Bravo Concept, the…

15 amazing photos of 1974 Lamborghini Bravo Concept, the dream-car that never made it into production.

Friends outing, Naples, Italy, July 1956. Photographed by Victor…

Friends outing, Naples, Italy, July 1956. Photographed by Victor Padolfi.

Etruscans Found in Sardinia

Italian authorities announced in 2018 that the first-ever Etruscan settlement has been discovered in Sardinia. The site dates to the 800s BCE and was strategically situated on the small island of Tavolara. It was likely intended to facilitate trade between Early Iron Age Sardinian Nuraghic communities, known to have inhabited Sardinia at the time, and Etruscan cities nearby on the Italian mainland. There had been extensive archaeological evidence of Etruscan-Nurghic exchanges, but this is the first evidence of an expatriate Etruscan community in Sardinia.

The Etruscans are famous for adopting many Greek cultural aspects and blending them with their own native culture. The resulting mélange in turn influenced Roman culture, which was initially a small backwater to the mighty Etruscans. One potential reason for the Etruscans’ strength? Extensive trading ties with southern Italy, Greece, and Sardinia.

The balloon man, Naples, Italy, 1950s. Photographed by Victor…

The balloon man, Naples, Italy, 1950s. Photographed by Victor Padolfi.