Category: maps

A Close Look At The First Use Of The Word “Ame…

This is the famous Waldseemüller map, from 1507. It is believed to be the first use of the word “America” as a name for the newly-encountered continents. Waldseemüller was apparently impressed with the stories of Amerigo Vespucci, and bestowed the name on today’s South America in honor of Vespucci.

Waldseemüller

also named North America “Parias” on this map. Parias came directly from a passage in the Four Voyages of Amerigo Vespucci: the expedition arrives at a region that was “situated in the torrid zone directly under the parallel which describes the Tropic of Cancer. And this province is called by them [the inhabitants] Parias.” The (possibly) indigenous name did not stick. (I had not heard the word “Parias” before writing this post, and you probably hadn’t either.) Instead, the two continents are called after a random Italian explorer because a random German mapmaker was a fan of the explorer’s book. But that’s history for you.

The Waldseemüller map was intended for a well-educated, elite audience. It was large, made of twelve panels, each 18 by 24.5 inches (46 cm by 62 cm). The entire map could be hung on a wall, or kept folded for when one wanted to reference a particular panel. One thousand copies of the map were printed, and unfortunately, there remains only one survivor in its entirety. It is now housed at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC.

Origins of the Word “University” in Various As…

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mapsontheweb: International crisis map, ca. 19…

mapsontheweb:

International crisis map, ca. 1950.

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The History of Urbanization

From the first cities around 3700 BCE up until 2000 CE.

A Stunning Soviet Map of NYC

The USSR military had extremely accurate maps of almost the entire world. This is their 1982 map of New York City, with Lower Manhattan in the upper right-hand corner, and Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty in the mid-left side. The map even includes the dimensions, and building materials, of the bridges.

mostly-history: 1905 map of Siberia, from the …

mostly-history:


1905 map of Siberia, from the Meyers Geographischer Hand-Atlas, published in Germany by Herrmann Julius Meyer.

Korea had two kingdoms from the 700s through t…

Korea had two kingdoms from the 700s through the early 900s CE. So it is imaginatively named the “North South States Period.” To the north, much larger than North Korea today, is Balhae and to the south is the surviving state from the earlier Three Kingdoms Period, Silla.

Korea had two kingdoms from the 700s through t…

Korea had two kingdoms from the 700s through the early 900s CE. So it is imaginatively named the “North South States Period.” To the north, much larger than North Korea today, is Balhae and to the south is the surviving state from the earlier Three Kingdoms Period, Silla.

Did You Know Neolithic Chinese Farmers Grew Mi…

Prehistoric farmers in what is today China had two main crops: millet in the north, rice in the south, and a vast middle region of mixed farming.

You should absolutely look at this map in high-resolution because there is a lot going on. It shows the northermost limit of rice cultivation and the southernmost limit of millet cultivation, possible centers of the domestication of each, and shows archaeological sites where rice, millet, or both were grown in prehistoric times.