Category: Mexico

Technically, she was known as Diego Rivera’s partner – an exotic eccentric. Her own work, while selling in her final decade, was often overshadowed by her Bohemian reputation, and her dressing in traditional Mexican costume. She could not live off her art until late in life.By 1953, such was her declining physical state that for her first Mexican solo show, her four poster bed was taken from her house to the gallery. Kahlo arrived by ambulance and was transferred from the ambulance to a stretcher to her bed.

She died in 1954, and her work as an artist was left to languish until it was rediscovered in the 1970s by art historians and political activists. As you know, she is now a worldwide household name. Quite a life-after-death.

440 Years Old And Filled With Footprints, These Aren’t Your Everyday Maps:

In 1577, King Philip II of Spain wanted to know whom he was ruling and where in his vast kingdom they were. So his viceroy asked the indigenous groups in what is now Mexico to draw some maps for him.

In response, they drew maps blending indigenous and Spanish traditions. Sometimes rivers are straight, with tiny arrows in the middle, to indicate which way they flow. Paths have footprints or hoofprints in the middle, to indicate whether the paths can be walked or ridden. These beautiful maps, and their way of recording the landscape, are a silent testimony to the survival of indigenous worldviews into the late 1500s.

Most people think the pizzas they know and love – four cheese, pepperoni – were invented in Italy. But they were actually developed by Italian immigrants in the United
States, and then exported back to Italy. Syracuse University
anthropologist Agehananda Bharati calls this the “pizza effect.” Here are some other examples of when
elements of a nation’s culture  developed elsewhere and were then reimported:

  • Mexico City’s Day of the Dead parade was invented for the James Bond film Spectre and then adopted by the city.
  • American blues music influenced English musicians in the 1960s, who then exported blues-rock to the United States.
  • Adapted from India’s chicken tikka, chicken tikka masala became one
    of the most popular dishes in Britain before being re-exported to India.
  • Yoga became popular in India after its adoption in the West.
  • Salsa music originated largely among Cuban and Puerto Rican
    immigrants to New York in the 1920s and then spread throughout the
    Americas.
  • Teppanyaki, the Japanese style of cooking on an iron griddle, grew to prominence in America in “Japanese steakhouses.”

Little boys at a ranch in Michoacan, Mexico, circa 1952. Photographed by Earl Leaf.

Local boys sing and play the guitar as they serenade a woman in Patzcuaro, Mexico, June 1962. Photographed by Earl Leaf.

After a villager notified authorities about a cave hidden beneath the Maya site of Chichen Itza, archaeologists crawled hundreds of feet through passages that were only 16 inches high in places. In the cave, they encountered hundreds of undisturbed ritual artifacts, including incense burners depicting the rain god Tlaloc.

Here’s the funny part – this was actually the second time this cave was discovered! The cave was first discovered by locals about 50 years ago. At the time, they alerted archaeologist Víctor Segovia Pinto to the find. He ordered the cavern sealed and issued a brief report, which was soon forgotten. Last year, locals once again pointed out the location to archaeologists, and this time they decided to actually investigate it.

This sounds like a bungled opportunity by Pinto but today’s archaeologists say it was a boon. Because everything was left in situ, and they plan to leave the artifacts in the cave now, it will remain an intact time capsule that can be studied with the most modern of techniques. Cutting edge 3-D mapping and paleobotany examinations are in the works. And who knows what scientists will come up with in the future? The current plan is that the cave, intact and preserved, will be waiting to be examined by each new generation of techniques.

A market in Mexico City, Mexico in 1965. Taken with Kodachrome.

via reddit

Emperor Maximilian of Mexico , circa 1864

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maximilian_I_of_Mexico Maximilian was Austrian Archduke and younger brother of Austrian Emperor Franz Joseph, he was offered Mexican crown by French Emperor Napoleon III whose army had invaded Mexico. 1866 after end of US civil war and worried by rise of Prussia in Europe Napoleon III pulled French troops back to Europe, Maximilian refused to follow and year later he was besieged, caught and executed by forces loyal to President Benito Juarez. He is buried in Habsburg dynasty imperial crypt in Vienna

Amazing pics that document everyday life of Mexico in 1902.

Gay men pose for a photo while being detained at a Police Station – Mexico, 1935

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