Category: Royalty

Grace Kelly – a timeless fashion icon through stunning photos.

Grace Kelly – a timeless fashion icon through stunning photos.

Your Tudor Fact for the Day

Catherine of Aragon was the first-ever female ambassador in Europe. She was named the ambassador from the kingdom of Aragon to England in 1507.

At the time, Catherine was the 22-year-old widow of the former crown prince, Arthur. He had died in 1502, and Catherine had stayed on in England and become betrothed to the new crown prince, Henry. It was not because Henry particularly wanted her. No, Catherine was still in England because her father-in-law King Henry VII did not want to give back Catherine’s very large dowry.

Catherine’s position was precarious.
She had little money, as neither her parents nor her penny-pinching father-in-law wished to support her financially. She had no status, as her husband was dead and her betrothed had remained just that for going on three years. Naming Catherine ambassador, therefore, was less a compliment to her diplomatic skills and more a way to bolster her position and therefore her parent’s.

Feathers were highly valued in Hawai’i and wer…

Feathers were highly valued in Hawai’i and were an important part of their religion. Feathers were used in representations of the gods. A high-status cloak made of feathers, called an ‘ahu ‘ula, was a marker of prestige and power. ‘Ahu ‘ula were worn with feathered helmets, or mahiole – a chief would have been decked from head to toe in feathers!

When Hawai’i became a kingdom in 1795, they were influenced by the monarchies of Europe, and eventually gave themselves a coat of arms. On it were two figures wearing red and yellow ‘ahu ‘ula and a mahiole.

Pathologic mandibular prognathism, or “H…

Pathologic mandibular prognathism, or “Habsburg jaw” is a deformity where the lower jaw outgrows the upper jaw. In other words the person has a big chin. It most famously appeared in the Habsburg family, but it exists in the bloodlines of many other royal families of Europe, perhaps first appearing in Vlad the Impaler!

Pathologic mandibular prognathism, or “H…

Pathologic mandibular prognathism, or “Habsburg jaw” is a deformity where the lower jaw outgrows the upper jaw. In other words the person has a big chin. It most famously appeared in the Habsburg family, but it exists in the bloodlines of many other royal families of Europe, perhaps first appearing in Vlad the Impaler!

Mendelssohn’s Wedding March became popular aft…

Mendelssohn’s Wedding March became popular after it was played on January 25th, 1858 at the wedding of Queen Victoria’s daughter, Princess Victoria.

Mendelssohn’s Wedding March became popular aft…

Mendelssohn’s Wedding March became popular after it was played on January 25th, 1858 at the wedding of Queen Victoria’s daughter, Princess Victoria.

Princess Grace of Monaco at Gstaad, Switzerland, 1962….

Princess Grace of Monaco at Gstaad, Switzerland, 1962. Photographed by Philippe Halsman.

One Is None, Two Is One: The Byzantine Traditi…

Did you know that the Byzantine Empire sometimes had two emperors? This was an old tradition dating back to Roman Emperor Diocletian in the late 200s CE, who created a system of four emperors, two senior emperors and two junior emperors. Byzantine co-emperors go back to at least the 400s CE with Leo II crowning his father Zeno co-emperor and promptly dying, making Zeno sole ruler. Not exactly off to a good start. But the co-emperor tradition continued. By the 900s it was common enough that there were distinct terms for the junior co-emperor (basileus) and senior co-emperor (autokratōr or occasionally megas basileus).

One of the more interesting co-emperors had not one co-ruler but four! Romanos I Lekapenos, an Armenian who became a major Byzantine naval commander, seized the royal palace and the reins of government in 919. In March he married his daughter to the reigning emperor, fifteen-year-old Constantine VII. In September Romanos decided that was not enough and had himself crowned co-emperor with his own made-up term for equal emperors “Caesar,” before finally, in December, naming himself the senior co-emperor or autokratōr

Romanos eventually crowned his own sons co-emperors: Christopher in 921, Stephen and Constantine in 924. For the time being, Constantine VII was regarded as first in rank after Romanos himself, Augustus to his Caesar. For his kindness to the man he deposed, Romanos I Lekapenos was given the nickname “the gentle usurper.”

Princess Grace: A look back at the life of the icon in the 1950s…

Princess Grace: A look back at the life of the icon in the 1950s through 37 glamorous photos.