Category: sexism

Sexism and Lobotomies

Unfortunately, and unsurprisingly, women were disproportionately given lobotomies during the psychiatric procedure’s heyday. From the 1940s through the mid-1950s, men slightly outnumbered women as patients in American state hospitals, yet female patients made up about 60 percent of those who underwent lobotomy. Many psychiatrists believed it was easier to return women after operation to a life of domestic duties at home than it was to post-operatively rehabilitate men for a career as a wage earner.

Sexism and Lobotomies

Unfortunately, and unsurprisingly, women were disproportionately given lobotomies during the psychiatric procedure’s heyday. From the 1940s through the mid-1950s, men slightly outnumbered women as patients in American state hospitals, yet female patients made up about 60 percent of those who underwent lobotomy. Many psychiatrists believed it was easier to return women after operation to a life of domestic duties at home than it was to post-operatively rehabilitate men for a career as a wage earner.

The Modern Young Woman

The San Francisco Examiner, California, March 1, 1933

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Born in Texas in 1892, to parents of African-American and Native…

Born in Texas in 1892, to parents of African-American and Native American descent, Bessie Coleman moved to Chicago at twenty-three and worked as a manicurist. Somehow, Coleman began listening to and reading stories about World War I pilots. She became fascinated. She tried to enter flying school in the United States, but none would admit her.

So she learned French, and moved to France in 1921, hoping to be admitted into less-racist flying schools there. Coleman was so determined to reach her goals that she learned a foreign language in her twenties, and moved across an ocean by herself. Wow. And it was all worth it: Coleman was able to earn her pilot’s license in France, in just seven months.

As the world’s first black civilian pilot – male or female – she was nicknamed “Queen Bess.” She returned to the United States and the same year she got her license, 1922, became the first African-American woman to fly a public flight in the United States. Queen Bess kept going, earning her living doing aerial shows and barnstormings; she specialized in stunt flying and parachuting. In 1926, at the age of thirty-four, she tragically fell to her death while rehearsing for an aerial show.

The San Bernardino County Sun, California, March 29, 1911

The San Bernardino County Sun, California, March 29, 1911

The Indianapolis Journal, Indiana, March 29, 1903

The Indianapolis Journal, Indiana, March 29, 1903

The Daily Times, New Philadelphia, Ohio, April 9, 1924

The Daily Times, New Philadelphia, Ohio, April 9, 1924

Stunning Sexism

Only 7 female chefs have ever been awarded 3 Michelin stars, since the ratings system started in 1900.

An Introduction to Problems of American Culture, 1931

An Introduction to Problems of American Culture, 1931